Friday, May 6, 2016

CURLY HAIR PROBLEMS?

This is an ongoing problem that comes with having curly hair.  Finding a hairstylist that has the patience to work on your curls can be challenging.  Curly hair and its spring pattern can be mis-interpreted if the hair is being cut wet. Resulting in, this curly hair problem.

Most hair salons and hairstylists claim that cutting curly hair is the same as cutting straight hair.  That is just NOT the case.  If all hair types are different, then why would cutting all hair be the same?  

Here at Twisted Hare Salon and Spa, we specialize in cutting curls the RIGHT way.  Our Deva inspired stylists understand that curls require extra attention, and whole different way of cutting. 

The Deva cutting technique is a revolutionary method for cutting curly hair whereas most traditional hair cutting techniques were created for straight hair.  The curls are cut dry, when in its most natural state.  The stylist works with each individual curl, sculpting your style to work with your individual curl pattern.  

Check out some of our BEFORE and AFTER photos, from Twisted Hare Salon and Spa!



Wondering if a Dry/Deva Cut is right for you?  Of course it is!  If you have curly hair, you must try a Deva Cut!  It will change everything you know about styling your hair! 

Friday, April 29, 2016

The Movement

Perms, Relaxers, and Brazilian Blowouts!  
What do these three things have in common? 
CHEMICALS. 

With the amount of chemicals, and side effects that come with having your hair chemically relaxed, it has encouraged thousands of naturally curly women, to be just that.  Natural. Some say it's a "just a trend."  However, with the expected 45% decrease in revenue, by 2019, for these services, it is far from just a trend. Natural hair has become a MOVEMENT. 

We have transitioned into a world where we have more options for "socially acceptable," hairstyles. 
More and more African-American women are saving hundreds of dollars a month, by going natural. 


The Affects of Chemical Relaxers: 
Respiratory infections, nosebleeds, coughing, hair breakage, and scalp irritation/burns, are just a FEW of the side affects of the chemicals used to relax curly hair. There are chemicals, such as, Lye (Sodium Hydroxide), used on women everyday. Sodium Hydroxide is the strongest type of principal chemical used in some chemical relaxers because it provides the most long lasting and dramatic effects.  This is a chemical found in most drain cleaners, as well as used in the plastic industry.  Lye is commonly used to give plastic more flexibility.  

Not exactly something you want to be coming into close contact with. 

Before going for it:
If chemical relaxers, or Brazilian blowouts is something you want to give a go:

SEE A PROFESSIONAL:  It may be much more expensive, but it is definitely worth it.  A professional should do a strand test before starting, to really see how your hair will react to the chemicals. 

DO YOUR RESEARCH:  You can't always believe what you read on the internet. Most products will read "lye free," however, most of the time that is false advertisement. Find out what products your salon uses before scheduling an appointment. Research those products, and all of the affects associated. There are many personal stories out there that you can read, both positive and negative, before making your decision. 

Check out our future blogs!  We'll be talking about going natural, and curly hair hacks!

Written by: ssamanthaxmariee



  1. If you're looking to embrace your fabulous curls, and try the natural way of things, come visit us at Twisted Hare Salon and Spa.  Let our natural believers teach you, enlighten you, and turn that inconvenience into confidence. 







Saturday, March 19, 2016

Q~Redew! Revive your Curls!


Having natural curls can seem like such an inconvenience to most.  I know, everyday, I fight a war against the mirror.  All the shampoo commercials we are forced to endure everyday on TV, give most curly girls an unrealistic view of how hair SHOULD look.  When I say should, I really mean how society thinks we should look.  

It's time for us curly curls to embrace how blessed we are to have such an incredible look.  There are woman out there who suffer through long perms, and chemical processes to have what we have. And how do we repay them?  By tying our hair up in a pony tail, putting on a hat, and calling it a day. Or worse, taking a flat iron to our locks each day. Which results in one word.  Damage. Damage. Damage.

Think about it, if everybody in the world embraced their natural hair, how many beauty industries would go out of business, almost instantly?

Twisted Hare Salon and Spa believes in natural.  Hair should not be an inconvenience.  It's a part of what makes us, well, us. Being a DevaCurl Salon, we know curls....and we know how to make the curls you want, obtainable. 

Looking for manageable second day curls?  Try the Q-Redew! 

If you're hoping to manage your curls on the first day, and even a day or two afterwards, then Steaming is for you! We offer the Q-Redew at our salon!  Just stop in and try it for yourself!

"The mist of the Q-Redew handheld hair steamer warms and softens the hair allowing you to rejuvenate, hydrate, reshape, and boost volume, de-tangle, stretch the hair, and more without re-wetting. The Q-Redew is intended to be used on wet or dry hair, but when used on dry hair it will leave your hair dry to the touch. No need to wait hours to dry. The Q-Redew provides a quick, convenient alternative in your hair care routine." -

For more information, please visit: http://qredew.com/



If you're looking to embrace your fabulous curls, and try the natural way of things, come visit us at Twisted Hare Salon and Spa. Let our natural believers teach you, enlighten you, and turn that inconvenience into confidence. 





Written By: ssamanthaxmariee


Thursday, September 3, 2015

Second Day Hair

At Twisted hare Salon we specialize in curly hair, and like to be very open minded.....I stumbled upon this blog on Naturallycurly.com by Allison Cooper that I would like to share with our readers.

Everyone has an opinion and a lot of the tips do work, but please listen to your hair.  Curly hair is as individual as people and although we like to generalize.... you can't. This is Allison's article and I will interject from time to time.

WHAT EXACTLY IS SECOND DAY HAIR?
And why do we want it?  
Second day hair is the process of getting your curly hair style to last two days rather than just one. This means that you are able save time in the morning to do other things. By skipping the shower and adding a few products you're able to prolong the style of your hair an extra twenty-four hours.

With the crazy, fast paced world that we live in, and the time that curly girls already contribute to their hair, having this second day is very important.

The key to getting second day hair rests in what you do on the night of first day hair, and how you take care of it.
By this, I mean that it's time to take out your coveted satin pillowcases and silk scarves and start sleeping on them or wearing them to bed, every night! A satin pillowcase, unlike cotton ones, will prevent your hair from catching, pulling and breaking during the night. This will leave you waking up in the morning with well-tamed tresses and will greatly aid in the ease of your morning regimen to help you achieve second day hair.
In addition to sleeping on a satin pillowcase, you can also try pineappling your hair. This method is where you take different sections of your hair and separate them by tying them with scrunchies. After the separation is complete, wrap with a silk scarf and go to bed! (Hint: this method even works on short curly hair!

If you've woken up after spending the night on your satin pillowcase, then you're ready for a quick and productive morning routine. The morning after routine is a bit different for everyone because achieving second day hair is different for each hair type. The main ingredient for everyone, however, is moisture.
This next sentence is where you need to listen to your hair.  Oil is not for everyone.  To keep second day locks moisturized and looking great, apply a small amount of oil (like coconut or rose oil), spray on mix of water and gel and then apply a leave in conditioner.  Then, hands off! The more you touch your curls, the more they will frizz.

Anther great tip is to use conditioner water.  Use a spraybottle with mostly water and add conditioner. Shake the mixture, and spray until the hair is damp. If you see the water bead up on the hair slide your palms down the shaft of the hair to press the water into the hairshaft, then scrunch or diffuse your curls.  Your curls will form faster if you use a hair diffuser instead of letting them air dry. Diffusing is great for s'wavy or wavy hair.

 The conditioner water should work for next day hair if your products are water soluble.  If your products are not water soluble then the water will not penetrate the hair shaft, and this process will not work for your hair.



Thursday, July 30, 2015

It Is Better To Love Your Hair The Way It Is

October 2014
Five years ago, a barker at the State Fair pulled me out of a crowd for a public demo of a new ceramic flatiron. In 15 minutes, the woman transformed my naturally curly hair into a sleek, glossy curtain. My hair looked shiny and smooth, straight out of a shampoo commercial. Complete strangers flocked to my side and told me how much better I looked. Onlookers lined up to buy flatirons of their own. My fiance’s eyes lit up when he saw me. I got the message; my curly hair was OK, but straight hair was better.
I bought the ceramic flatiron from the State Fair barker, but my attempts to straighten my own hair never came close to replicating her perfect results. I was clumsy, and impatient.
I would try and straighten several clumps of hair at once, then linger on a smaller section until I could smell it burning. My ironed hair would start out flat and lifeless, singed into submission; as the humid summer days wore on, my hair would transform into a not-quite-straight and not-quite-curly pyramid. I might have accepted the truth at that point: I had curly hair, not straight hair. I was flat out incompetent at straightening my own hair, and I’d be better off using my limited hairstyling skills trying to make the most of my curls.
But then, the Groupon for a Brazilian Blowout caught my eye. For 50% off the usual price, I could have sleek, frizz- free hair that would stay straight. I’d read some scary things on the internet about dangerous chemicals in the Brazilian Blowout Formula, but I brushed those warnings aside. How bad could it be? I was willing to try anything once. The stylist who administered my Brazilian Blowout assured me that she’d done hundreds of them, and that no one had ever experienced any problems.
The result was even better than the State Fair flatiron, shiny, smooth and manageable. After the first week, my hair settled into beachy waves that straightened with relative ease after 15 minutes with the flatiron. Everyone I knew fell all over themselves telling me how much better my hair looked, and I was sold. Brazilian Blowouts were a miracle, I told anyone who would listen. My hair has never looked better, or felt healthier. But, the results were short lived. Over the next few months, my hair gradually shifted into the familiar not-quite-curly, not-quite-straight triangle that always arose when I tried to straighten my hair.
I started noticing something else, something more alarming: when I caught a glimpse of my reflection in the mirror, I’d see light shining through my hair. In the shower, hair would come out in clumps whenever I’d wash it. My hair had always been thick and abundant, and now my ponytail was noticeably thinner. I panicked and combed the internet for reassurance that the damage I’d done to my hair would not be permanent. The horror stories I’d brushed off so cavalierly before my Brazilian Blowout came back to haunt me.
I resolved to swear off hair straightening forever. I booked an appointment at the East 42nd Street salon, stocked up on DevaCurl products, started scrunching, and banished the flatiron to the back of my closet. Slowly, my hair started recovering, and now, almost two years after my ill-fated Brazilian Blowout, my hair is thick and curly again, much more manageable now that I’ve committed to getting regular hair cuts and styling it properly. I learned my lesson, though: It’s better to love your hair the way it is, than to lose your hair trying to change it.
Written by: Rosie the Ringletter

Fashion, Curly Hair, and The Runway


Fashion, Curly Hair, and the Runway

With 70% of the population being curly- one wonders why do we see so much straight hair?

The history of style and fashion is long and storied with the emergence of Haute Couture during the reign of Marie Antoinette and Louis XVI.  Although things have changed in the fashion world in recent decades, curly hair had a long run as the stylish woman’s texture of choice.  Lorraine Massey, author of the Curly Girl:  The Handbook, said it best “You never see straight hair on a Botticelli goddess or Rubens angel”.   As quickly as fashion changes, so do hairstyles and today the runways are filled with analogous straight hairstyles
So where did our curls go?!

Beginning in the 1900s we said goodbye to curly locks and welcomed in much shorter, straighter hairstyles.  The timing coincided with big events:  the Great Depression, WWI, WWII.  With the focus on finances, women entering the workforce and war, curly hair was manipulated into a straighter look bringing straighter styles into fashion.

With this shift, a multi-billion dollar industry was born in hair straightening products and services.  As a result of societal pressure to fit this cultural ideal of beauty, women and men alike endure sometime-painful or unhealthy hair treatments.  The recent boom of Brazilian Blowout hair straightening treatments was quickly followed by news that exposure to one of the main ingredients, formaldehyde, is classified as a known carcinogen in gaseous form.  This new definition of beauty has even drawn national attention as a tool for racism, sexism, and classism – but that is a topic for another day!
Thankfully for those of us who love our naturally curly hair, the trends are changing again!  Although high fashion has been slow to respond, relegating curls to ‘street fashion’ type shows, the natural hair movement is gaining steam!

To help celebrate, and help men and women everywhere to love your hair the way it is, Twisted Hare Salon & Spa is excited to be doing a charity event fashion show kicking off Fashion Week Minnesota #FWMN  showing curly hair on the runway, clothing by the Minnesota College of Art and Design modeled by Curlies from around the Twin Cities! #SavetheDate, September 20, 2015, come see Through the Looking Glass:  Where Curls Meet Fashion and help us team up with Crave, Muse Event Center, Lorraine Massey, and OIE to help raise money for Keepa Child Alive!,  Check out our event page www.events.thetwistedhare.com.   Amusee Wine will also be at the event pairing wine with your curl type.  Can you imagine...Botticelli curls....mmmm...Sauvignon Blanc?  Cheers! As Lorraine Massey says Curls are not a fad they're a life style.  Long Live Curls!!!

 

Sunday, July 26, 2015

INTERVIEW WITH THE LORRAINE MASSEY December 2014

You never see straight hair on a Botticelli goddess or Rubens angel.  But within the last twenty years, lots of people began hiding their curly hair, and hardly anyone talked about it. When we did talk about our curls, we usually didn’t have anything good to say. Those of us with curls used the same shampoos and styling tools as our naturally straight haired friends, and then wondered why, after twenty minutes of humidity or rain, our hair looked frizzy, unwieldy, and lifeless.  In the last two decades, a quiet revolution has been unfurling.  Despite the ubiquity of flat-ironed hair on makeover shows, in movies, and on TV, natural curls are starting to make their presence known. 

As founder of a curly haired salon chain, developer of a styling product line, and author of the seminal curly style bible, Curly Girl: The Handbook, Lorraine Massey has been at the forefront of this revolution since the beginning.  Lorraine met up with me to share her philosophy about why curls are poised for a comeback, and the need for all women to embrace our natural beauty. 

“From a very young age, I kept dreaming that somebody would one day jump out from a bush on the street and say, ‘I know what to do with your hair!’  I never imagined it would turn out to be me,” Lorraine said.  As an early advocate for eliminating sulfate shampoo, cutting curly hair dry, and scrunching to encourage curl definition, Lorraine initially faced skepticism from the hair styling community. “At first, I was so alone in this path with only a handful of loyal curly girls whose curls could not be contained, even if we tried. I’d go to hair shows for so many years.  I’d present curl care techniques, and hairdressers would hurry by our booth uninterested.  There was so much humidity around our curl booth they would run by because their hair started to curl at the mere sprinkle of hydration.  Or they’d stand there with their arms crossed, and armed with an arsenal of flat irons in their bags and on their heads.

“Our Cosmetology schools are still very archaic and many of them desperately need to update their data and curriculum. The teachers tell the students that cutting curly hair is the same as cutting straight hair. As logic set, stylists are starting to realize that curly hair cannot be compared to naturally straight hair.  Now have a new emerging breed of hairdressers have decided that there is more to hair crafting than blowdrying everyone who sits in their chair. There are new ideas, new products.  Curls are becoming very modern, and within the next few years they will be 'mane' stream-pun intended!” 

Lorraine noticed that one group of people has always talked about curly hair: curly haired women.  “Women with curls are truly curious about this natural garden growing on top of our heads. We look at each other on the street, Smiling, knowing that curly girl has gone through probably the same experience as me. It’s like a grass roots curl club.” Curly haired women ask one another for styling tips and commiserate about their worst hair disasters minutes after meeting each other.  Lorraine points out that many women impose the myth that straight hair is more attractive, polished, or professional, on themselves. “But, then again, many may have heard their boss say that their hair is not acceptable and needs to be sedated. It’s a subtle form of prejudice. Curls are not a symptom to be treated.  They need to be understood. To me, a blow-fry with broken singe, flying strands at the front and crown, and dried out ends doesn’t look professional at all but has become the norm.”

"We are not born loving our curls," Lorraine says. "To find their natural beauty, women have to “get to know their curls before loving them,”  but Lorraine acknowledges that that isn’t always easy.  “The young ones particularly are not comfortable with the forever changing aspect of their curls (like a mood ring). It can seem hard to manage as an adult, never mind as a child. It helps if mum is wearing her curls with pride so her little one will follow in her curly footsteps"

Lorraine also views embracing natural curls as a way we can take a stand for authenticity and diverse beauty. “I couldn't help but notice as I was at the gym, looking at all the TV screens that are imposed upon you, that all the women presenters were so fake-looking. Fake hair, fake boobs, fake nails, some with fake tans. I’m interested in what lies beneath. We are brainwashed to think this is what we should strive to look like. We may be craving to see someone natural, someone relatable but we don't know it, because this is all we know. I find it odd that we all want to look the same.” 

In spite of the narrow standard of beauty we often see in the media, Lorraine has seen signs that curly hair is poised for a comeback--although she maintains that it never really left. “I’m meeting new curly girls every day: Women in their forties and even their seventies who are finally ready to embrace their curls.  A new curly girl is born every day. 

Florida congresswoman Debbie Wasserman Schultz has brought natural curls to the national political stage. The singer Lorde tops the billboard charts and graces magazine covers. Curly haired icon Annie is returning to movie theaters this year.  Lorraine herself is developing an original musical about hairdressers with an emphasis on the need for each person to find her own, unique inner and outer beauty. “What ultimately humbles us and brings us all together in the end is nature.  Curly hair is still not really mainstream yet, but it will be, as our DNA cross-pollinates and transmutes with amazing multi-textures.  There will be new species of curls emerging that we have never seen before because we were busy hiding them under weaves and flattening them with heat. Stylists will take their craft to a very modern cutting edge approach, once they have well trained their clients to know their curls better than anyone else can.  You’ll see individualized, beautiful shapes. It’s going to be very exciting. You might even see some curl envy perhaps.  Imposter curly girls with perms (for the truly naturally straight girl) might come back into style.”


When was the moment you realized that you couldn't fight your curls anymore?  When did you embrace your true Curly Hair Nature?